Storage Blog by STORED – London Storage & Lifestyle Tips

SHARE

Walking around central London its easy to get wrapped up in the amazing architecture and mix of traditional and modern buildings. But what lurks behind a lot of them and the Greater London area is a bunch of disused and abandoned buildings that have either not kept up with the changing pace of the city or just simply been left behind…

Asylum Chapel, Peckham

Abandoned property London

Asylum Chapel, Peckham

Built somewhere between 1827-33, this disused chapel is part of a complex of almshouses in Peckham, South East London that was left in disarray. The inside of the ‘Asylum’ (meaning sanctuary) was stripped by an explosive device dropped during World War Two but astonishingly the amazing stained glass windows remained intact!

Abandoned London Places

Ayslum Chapel, Peckham

Nowadays the chapel is leased by a couple of artists who use the space for exhibitions, art projects, weddings and other events.

Aldwych underground station

Abandoned place London

Aldwych Station, disused platform.

Opened in 1907, under the name ‘Strand’, Aldwych underground station was a terminus for a branch of the Piccadilly line. The station was in use, despite low-traffic- until 1940 when it became a bomb-shelter during the war. It reopened in 1946 after the war and remained open until 1994 despite dwindling numbers due to other stations opening around it.

Abandoned place London

Aldwych Station, Bomb Shelter, WWII

These days it’s used as a tube station in a number of Film and TV shows and TFL offer tours around this disused station every now and again.

Waterloo – Necropolis Station

In another rail related abandonment, London is home to one of the stranger and darker stations. Waterloo station once ran a special line straight to Brookwood cemetery – it allowed the deceased and their mourners to travel straight from central London to the cemetery to be laid to rest.

Abandoned London Places

Waterloo – Necropolis Railway

Started as an answer to the rising public health concerns in London after it’s first cholera epidemic the station had two sections, one for Anglican users and one for ‘Nonconformists’. Key in this religious time.

Abandoned public London

Waterloo – Necropolis Railway

The station was bombed in 1941 but the facade still stands.

Maunsell Forts, Thames Estuary

Abandoned place London

Maunsell Forts, Thames Estuary

These disused armed towers out in the Thames estuary were decommissioned in the 1950s but are still standing to this day. Built in the early 1940’s as part of the war effort the forts were there to fight off both naval and air forces coming over from Germany.

Abandoned place London

Maunsell Forts, Thames Estuary

After being decommissioned the forts were snapped up as the perfect place to set up pirate radio stations that were huge throughout the middle of the 20th century. Pirate radio brought cutting edge music to the ‘teenagers’ of the day that mainstream radio providers such as the BBC wouldn’t play due to strict broadcasting rules.

Abandoned place London

Principality of Sealand

One of the towers now houses what claims to be an independent micronation ‘The Principality of Sealand’ which is supposedly the worlds smallest nation!

Abbey Mills Pumping Station, Stratford

Abandoned place London

Abbey Mills Pumping Station, Stratford

This abandoned water pumping station is East London is perhaps the most picturesque on our list. Described as ‘The Cathedral of Sewage’ Abbey Mills was built in in the lat 1880’s had two engines on each arm of a cruciform plan that lead to this name.

Abandoned place London

Flooded C Station Pump House

The building is now grade 2 listed but you can easily see that some of the areas have been left in disarray after the new pump house was built a couple of hundred metres down the road.

Abandoned place London

Abbey Mills Pump Station, Stratford

The building’s beautiful victorian interiors are now often used as locations for things such as the ‘Arkham Asylum’ in 2005’s Batman Begins or as a location in the Coldplay video ‘Lovers In Japan’

Got any other abandoned places in London you think we could add to this list? Drop us a comment below and let us know.

Head to our guides section to find more articles like this!

Whether you’re moving, downsizing or just decluttering…

[vc_btn title=”Start Storing” style=”gradient-custom” gradient_custom_color_1=”#16bd8c” gradient_custom_color_2=”#239112″ size=”lg” align=”center” button_block=”true” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bystored.com%2F%23homepageWizard||target:%20_blank|”]

SHARE
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
8 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Julie
Julie
3 years ago

How easy is it to get permission to photograph abandoned buildings and who do you approach for permission.
Kind Regards
Julie

Alex
Alex
3 years ago

Amazing. Mostly beautiful architecture.

Niki
Niki
3 years ago

I was at asylum chapel last weekend for a wedding. So beautiful!

Monica Carter
Monica Carter
3 years ago

Such a shame they are not reused for something useful simple living accommodation perhaps.

katie
katie
Reply to  Monica Carter
2 years ago

actually Monica, these derelict sights are far more beautiful and interesting than another flat rebuild. these places are what make London so interesting and secretive. what would you prefer to look at? old decayed buildings that have a history to them or new refurbished boring buildings that you see everyday, everywhere? I know my awsner, Monica. nows th time to change yours :(((

Neil
Neil
3 years ago

What about the Millennium Mills? I think it’s probably going to be refurbished soon if the work hasn’t started already.

Sindhu Selvaraj
Sindhu Selvaraj
3 years ago

Good post

Veronika
Veronika
2 years ago

Hi! Is it possible to just go and take pictures/film for non-commercial purposes?

Many thanks!!

8
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x